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Pollinating Trees of Michigan: Windows and Screen Cleaning

As the vibrant colors of spring emerge in West Michigan, so do the pollinating trees and shrubs that bring life to our landscapes. While their blossoms and foliage enhance the beauty of our surroundings, they can also leave behind a trail of debris that can clog windows and screens. In this article, we will explore some of the prominent pollinating trees in West Michigan and discuss the importance of timely window and screen cleaning to maintain a clean and inviting living space.


  Acer rubrum
Acer rubrum

One of the most common and beautiful trees in West Michigan, the Red Maple, is known for its stunning red flowers that bloom in early spring. These flowers attract bees, butterflies, and other pollinators, ensuring the tree's reproduction. However, as the flowers fade and fall, they can accumulate on windows and screens, obstructing the view and reducing natural light.


                                                           Cercis canadensis
Cercis canadensis

With its eye-catching pink or purple flowers, the Eastern Redbud adds a touch of elegance to the West Michigan landscape. This tree's blossoms provide nectar to bees and butterflies, encouraging their vital role in pollination. As the flowering phase ends, the Redbud's spent flowers can create a buildup on windows and screens, hampering their functionality and aesthetics.


 Amelanchier spp.
Amelanchier spp.

The delicate white flowers of the Serviceberry tree signal the arrival of spring in West Michigan. These flowers attract bees, flies, and other insects, ensuring successful pollination. However, once the flowers transform into small fruits, they may fall and accumulate on windows and screens, obstructing the view and hindering the passage of fresh air.


      Malus spp
Malus spp

Crabapple trees, with their abundant and colorful blossoms, create a visual spectacle during the spring season. Bees are particularly drawn to the nectar-rich flowers, facilitating the pollination process. However, as the petals drop, they can cling to windows and screens, creating a barrier that obstructs the view and collects unwanted dust and debris.



The Black Cherry tree blossoms in late spring, offering clusters of delicate white flowers that attract bees, butterflies, and other pollinators. While these blossoms signify the tree's reproductive success, they can also contribute to the accumulation of debris on windows and screens. Timely cleaning ensures unobstructed views and prevents the buildup of unwanted residues.


In West Michigan, the pollinating trees and shrubs that grace our landscapes bring life and color to our surroundings. However, their blossoms and subsequent debris can stick to and hinder the appearance of windows and screens. By understanding the types of pollinating trees in the region and their potential impact on our living spaces, we can appreciate the importance of regular window and screen cleaning. A clean and clear view not only enhances our enjoyment of the outdoors but also ensures a fresh and inviting atmosphere within our homes. As the flowering season comes to an end in West Michigan around the second week of June, it is a great time to start exterior cleaning and enjoy the coming summer with renewed vibrancy.

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